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Yes, in Your Backyard: Experts To Discuss ‘Unexpected Surprises’ in Unincorporated Comal County

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Yes, in Your Backyard: Experts To Discuss ‘Unexpected Surprises’ in Unincorporated Comal County

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Explosive growth is reshaping the look-and-feel of unincorporated Comal County, and there’s little commissioners can do to control “unexpected surprises” like quarries and multi-acre gas stations. This 205-acre tract located at U.S. Route 281 and FM 306 is described on crexi.com as an excellent opportunity for single-family and/or commercial development.

Are you concerned about unpleasant surprises like huge rock quarries or multi-acre gas stations showing up near your neighborhood?

Comal County commissioners have limited authority over what gets built in unincorporated areas.

Pct. 4 Commissioner Jen Crownover, Comal County Conservation Alliance President Elizabeth Bowerman and Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance Executive Director Annalisa Peace will discuss possible workarounds to promote “civilized and rational” growth in one of the fastest-growing areas in the country at noon, Nov. 16 at Tye Preston Memorial Library, 16311 S. Access Rd.

‘County Authority on Land Use’ is sponsored by the League of Women Voters of the Comal Area (LWV-CA), which will livestream the meeting and post a recording to its YouTube channel, @LWV Comal Area.

Crownover will outline limits of county authority as set out in Texas’s constitution. Bowerman will delineate the detrimental effects of lack of authority on the environment. Peace will discuss efforts to expand the limits of county authority and explain how some counties have worked around them.

“We need to provide county governments with effective means for planning appropriate land uses within their own counties and across county lines,” Peace said.

LWV-CA believes Comal County commissioners, with voter approval, should be granted additional regulatory authority from the state legislature for making land-use decisions.

In its land-use statement, the league suggests the county be able to implement impact fees on developers of new subdivisions; require minimum fire-suppression systems in new subdivisions; require improvements to roadways and drainage systems serving new subdivisions; limit the amount of impervious cover to increase recharge and limit runoff in new subdivisions; require subdivision restrictions that promote water-conserving landscapes; and require natural areas, or neighborhood parks, in new areas.

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12 Comments

  1. Candy Cargill November 14, 2022

    YOU CAME HERE FROM THERE
    BECAUSE YOU DIDN’T LIKE IT THERE,
    AND NOW YOU WANT TO CHANGE
    HERE TO BE LIKE THERE. YOU ARE
    WELCOME HERE, ONLY DON’T TRY TO
    MAKE HERE LIKE THERE. IF YOU
    WANT TO MAKE HERE LIKE THERE,
    YOU SHOULDN’T HAVE LEFT THERE IN
    THE FIRST PLACE.
    Anonymous

    Reply
  2. CB Harper November 3, 2022

    The main issue remains water resources. Absolutely criminal to allow developers and quarries to destroy that resource.

    Seems to me we should be able to limit that and govern exploration, recharge and runoff. Lots of approaches to that target.

    Otherwise we run the risk of becoming Texafornia, God help us.

    Reply
  3. The Ewings November 1, 2022

    Seems that Hill Country is an endangered species heading towards being replaced with Stone Oaks and urban sprawl. Would think the people and state of Texas would have an interest in preserving Hill Country as something of value. Haven’t seen a traffic light installed yet that was necessary yet, and people welcome the destruction of country living. Fly into Los Angeles and you get 1 hour approach looking at rooftop after rooftop non-stop, going from North Los Angeles down to now San Diego, and East to Palm Springs without a pause in rooftops; no greenbelts or nature … and they have no source of water other than robbing others and misuse by agriculture inappropriate to the arid region. Where’s the leadership, tangible platforms to vote for, or debate?

    Reply
  4. Robert J. Hennesy October 25, 2022

    Ya all a bunch of damm crybabies and Karen’s. Talking about stuff you know nothing about. You live in rock houses with concrete foundations, driveways made from stone and asphalt or maybe concrete. You have copper wires, metal roofs or shingles. Plastic pipes. You fertilize your lawn plants and trees. Ya got electric from coal. Drive cars made from metal, plastic, copper and chemicals, all derived from mining and quarries. Don’t forget your cell phone and that big screen TV.
    Sure those builders get away with clear cutting, destroying animal habitat, sucking the water from Canyon Lake and every puddle they can find. But you’re right there buying those houses. Maybe you should think about holding off on that purchase. If those so called Commissioner’s at county court had any guts, than its time to vote them out. O yea they sure claimed they had the power and guts to lock ya down over covid so you lost your house and jobs. Don’t let them lie to ya.
    It’s a money grab by the builders, judges and lawyers, and it’s your money there taking. By the way your Donna Campbell wants a mile buffer around quarries, is that not anti-business? None of these people are for you not even HOA or POAs. There just politicians in training. And don’t forget those from California that are not welcome here unless they leave their politics behind them and quit trying to change Texas.
    You need people that work for you, not their wallet and purses. We don’t need greed. Seems they never have enough. The big house, the fancy cars, elite schools for the little brats. They all need spend some time in the big house, maybe they will learn something.

    Reply
  5. Gwen S. Sternberg October 24, 2022

    When I lived on the lake LBJ, what they did was Incorporate the subdivisions all around the lake into small Cities. Then the members of the Community could vote on matters at City Council meetings and at POA meetings. They had their own City Council and Mayor, and the mayor and secretary were the only ones paid. The City Council were all volunteers. We had a city of 400 people. The city had its own permit department. It worked out well, but you have to hire an Attorney to self-incorporate.

    Reply
  6. Barbara Thomason October 24, 2022

    Thank you! Our County Commissioners need more regulatory powers to help us protect our property values. If you want examples of where lack of regulations have failed regions, just look at Lakeway or theFM 1960 area of Houston.
    I would ask that we add to the list controlling the proliferation of billboards and enforcing the existing state law banning bandit signs on roadsides and poles in the ROW. We voters can free the limits that bind them.

    Reply
  7. Martelli October 19, 2022

    What makes a great place to live is ultimately what kills it. Comal County is no exception. There folks like me who have been pushing the lack luster efforts to make this county a 1 acre min size lot for 20 years – but nothing is moved forward- if there has been some news- then please share. Also being unincorporated is not popular – BUT if we dont do it, then you ALL get what you get so dont throw a fit- you deserve what you get- like all the other little areas, in Texas. its laughable – all you hear is- ” thats why I moved to Comal County- no cities all rural, no city taxes etc…. on and on….again laughable- what make this area great will be its demise unless these changes are not put into effect. POA- HOA are the same- people come here and are anti POA-HOA…… sometimes for good reason and those entities always get a bunch of Karen’s on the board and your grass get 6 inches to high and you get a letter from those board members – So, why complain when a neighbor comes in and puts up a boat storage or brings in animals or what ever into or next to you you dont have a leg to stand on with out a POA- HOA…. again – you get what you get…! The other option is to move.

    With 1600-1700 students entering Comal ISD each year for the next 4-7 years where land for TWO new High schools will be built West of Hwy 46 past Bulverde and North of NB east of IH-35 behind Walmart Dist. center, expect more of the same – Katy Texas….. oh yes, HWY 281- in 20 months – South of Borgfeld rd.- completed and North HWY. 281 pat Borgfeld rd.- phase two all the way to HWY 46. I almost forgot – FM 306- Sattler east to NB- 4 lanes beginning next year….Either vote and and do something or do what most people do 65-70% sit back and watch and let it happen…. or move.- Good luck.

    Reply
  8. Gary Goessling October 18, 2022

    The county should mandate minimum lot sizes of one acre or greater in order to maintain a hill country feel. Having worked in the residential housing development industry in California for 45 years I have seen what high density tracts due to a specific area. I don’t think developers and government have the best interests of the community in mind always. Keep Canyon Lake’s rural feel!!

    Reply
  9. Raul Flores October 18, 2022

    The reason they are a surprise to residents is because Commissioners Court fails to notify residents when an application is made. For example, Canyon Ranch MUD, which was applied for with the TCEQ in February 2021. Comal County Commissioners, including the current Pct 4 commissioner, were notified of this application in September of 2021…

    Reply
  10. Jeff Leonard October 18, 2022

    This is just another blatant power and fee grab. Quarries, as much as we may not like them in our backyard, don’t get developed unexpectedly. There are always multiple hearings about such development giving residents many opportunities to have their voices heard. I am resolutely opposed to giving more power to county officials over development in unincorporated areas. The League of Women Voters should be wiser than to align themselves with this cause. We have more than ample regulation over land use already in the county. Time to cease and desist.

    Reply
  11. L. Carnes October 18, 2022

    I really don’t have a problem with people having homes to purchase in areas which are available for such. Also, some areas do need more business for the people living in those areas now for multitudes of years and have to drive a long way to get things. Just so builders follow the law on all of this. They really should help protect our trees for sure. Water run off also is important. So, let’s not go ballistic and gripe and complain. Certainly, some areas get over built and I think that should be a consideration before approving buildings of any kind. I see in Seguin now they are over building personal homes. It looks like they think the entire world will be living there in a short time. Oh, forgot something. Overcharging’s starts happening by some builders, and also by some utility companies. They act like oh boy, now we can really get these cats who want to live out here and make a lot of money. Capitalism is fine but when one abuses it problems can occur. Greed is the problem, MONEY and the LOVE of it!! Not charging anyone at all but does seem to be what goes on around the nation. I do love my builders, business owners, and those who work to make things fine for the citizens who are in government, police departments and first responders etc.! Have no problems, just sending out a little be careful deal, make it work well and fine for all. Welcome to the Hill Country.

    Reply
  12. John Mooney October 17, 2022

    Hopefully, there will be some dedication to the rock quarries, specifically, Vulcan Quarry, and the ongoing legal battle between Vulcan, their alliance with TCEQ, and thir citizen’s representatives. The unencumbered “free range” of the quarries in Texas has become totally distrustful, and a disgrace to the state and the government representatives of Texas.

    Reply

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